A family holiday in pictures

We only had weather like this one whole day. Trust me that we enjoyed it from breakfast on the terrace till stargazing on the beach at night. This picture is taken from the front door of the family summer house, just to give you an idea. We’re in Pagham, Sussex.

 

David caught a mackerel and ate it!

Linda is showing off her wellies! Low tide and high winds.

 

Notice the “door steps”. When the tide is high, it really is. The road along the harbour is flooded on a daily basis! This is Bosham, Sussex.

Hot chocolate with whipped cream and marshmallows is just the cure for a rainy day!

We went to Portsmouth and toured the Victory, Admiral Nelson’s ship at the battle of Trafalgar.

 

The plaque commemorating that Nelson fell here on this exact spot and a view heavenward, where you can get an idea of the weather conditions!  We can really recommend Portsmouth Historic Dockyard for a day or two out – also when the weather is good! We had a great time!

And here’s what we did when it just poured with rain (there wasn’t room for anything as prosaic as playing cards in this picture, but we did play a lot of Canasta and Estimation Whist):

(don’t bother burgling us – we always sleep with our Iphones and most of the gear isn’t ours anyway…)

 

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Days in and days out

My oldest son Emil and his girlfriend Ida are spending some time with us this week. Where we’ve hardly been up to London since we got here, obviously the two youngsters didn’t want to miss out on the big city. And they wanted me and Dane to come along (David was away on business). So we all took the train from Woking to Waterloo. It only takes 20 minutes, so it’s really not such a big deal.

Also our friends Lotte and David were in town with their son, Dane’s best friend, Adam.

We trotted around a bit without any particular aim, but then Ida wanted SHOPPING and Dane wanted HAMLEY’S… So Emil let himself be dragged round crowded clothes shops (sale’s on!) and I let myself be dragged round Hamley’s – five floors of toys. Only the the girlie-floor can be avoided… Anyway, Dane was quite good about it and I got off lightly…

We met up with our friends and spent the afternoon together. We had dinner in an Iraqi restaurant on Edgware road. After dinner we tried to find a place to have a cup of coffee, that wasn’t completely crowded and also would accommodate our two little boys. All the Neros, the Starbucks and the Costas were either crowded or with only inside seating, so we just trotted on and on. In the end we were rewarded – we found a little French Café, the French Bakery, in James Street (off Oxford Street) where we had lovely coffee, good sweets and great service. From Waterloo we made it home in exactly 34 minutes (including taxi from Woking – Dane was too tired to walk – it was after all 11 pm).

We tried to make the most of Emil’s and Ida’s stay, so the next day we did a barbecue with David’s cousin Karen and her two boys Robert and Max. We sat out all evening and enjoyed the rare balmy night.

 

In the weekend we took a longer trip to the CLA Game Fair in Oxfordshire at Blenheim Palace. Emil just absolutely had to visit the app. 50 suppliers of fishing equipment all present in one spot. His hands were practically shaking… (maybe I haven’t told you, but he’s an avid fisherman and has recently started fly-fishing). David is also rather mad about fishing, so Ida and I just tagged along, knowing that there would be lots of other things to look at. Although an extremely hot day, it was still nice and even Dane had a good time.

  

With two new fly-fishing rods aquired the obvious next step was of course going fishing.

No way that Ida, Dane and I wanted to stare at those two throwing their lines all day, so we spent the hot, hot day at Hampton Court Palace. We enjoyed it very much – Ida is a real castle & museum kind of girl, bless her! And Dane was at his very best behaviour, curiously interested in furniture, four poster beds and tapestries. He’s rather fascinated with Henry VIII. But then, he is a most fascinating character, isn’t he?

Now we’ve sent Ida and Emil home and are by ourselves again. David has spent three days doing our tax returns for both Denmark and England. An absolutely horrifying enterprise! All three of us are very happy that it’s done now!

What’s left now is to plan our holiday. You may laugh at this – planning your holiday after August 1st, but it was only in March we came back from six months of fantastic holiday and we’ve decided to go very low key and local this summer. We’ll spend some time with David’s sister and her family at the summer house on the coast in Sussex and then we’ll go and visit David’s older brother in North Wales. Dane has another five weeks left of his summer holidays, so we’ll also make some day trips to get to know this bit of England better.

More pictures with captions (see Emil’s three beautiful salmon trouts) on Flickr.

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We have officially re-entered the South

as we are now in Memphis, Tennessee. More about that tomorrow, when we’ve actually seen something other than this, the bleakest of campsites.

Yesterday morning David got up very early again – despite the freezing cold.

Inspired by the catch the night before, he litterally flew out of the RV and down to the river (Ohio River, Indiana) where he started pulling out fish. It was quite the reverse of the previous week. When Dane woke up, he quickly joined David to catch some fish of his own.

We drove further along the Ohio into Illinois and then into Kentucky. I’d made a “slight” miscalculation reading the map – not noticing that the crossing of the Ohio I’d chosen was actually not a bridge, but a ferry! We debated a little whether we dared chance it and go for the ferry – not having any idea how wide the river was going to be at that point, what kind of ferry it was, if it would let RVs on board, how often it sailed. And sunset was approaching fast, with another 30 miles to drive on the other side of the river – or 60 if we couldn’t get on board. We decided to chance it – and – if we weren’t lucky once more!

And so – besides having saved around 30 miles’ driving, we had this quite fantastic experience of being ferried across the river on this little pram together with 3-4 other vehicles (=pick-up trucks), that clearly made this journey every day! Check out that sunset! More pictures here. Furthermore it was free!

And speaking of luck, check the weather forecast for Memphis!

On today’s journey I was the one with a song in my head. And it’s not by Elvis. It’s probably one of my 20 favourite songs. Paul Simon’s Graceland.

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The mother road

 

Yesterday and today we’ve been travelling the Mother Road – Route 66. To be perfectly honest, it doesn’t distinguish itself a whole lot compared to so many other roads we’ve travelled. But the part we’ve been on (along the Ohio River in Indiana) is both hilly, forested and curvy, so fun to travel. Yesterday afternoon we found a cute little campsite (more like a parking lot with electric hook-ups, gas station and trucker restaurant). Again we had an undisturbed view of the river and again David went fishing. And this time he got lucky – that’s after a week of complete draught, not a fish in sight for many days. In the dark and cold evening he caught a beautiful walleye.

That sure made his day!

We had dinner at the above mentioned restaurant. We were the only customers – alone with the two sweet waitresses and a huge tv. We watched some CNN to catch up with world news, but didn’t really figure out whether anything really important has happened out there.

Check more photos here.

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Gone west

First we went to Vermont, to a campsite in the Green Mountains. We didn’t particularly like it, but we can’t be picky at this time of year, where open campsites are few and far between. As a family we’re not quite in agreement about the quality of campsites. David and I don’t like the ones with lots of “entertainment”, whereas Dane loves them. We like the quiet ones where the love of nature is the reason for camping, rather than playing party games with other campers. The campsite in Maine (outside Freeport), where everything was taken care of by one person, Missy, who also had a job at L.L. Bean, was just for us. Undisturbed in the woods, small, few amenities, nice and friendly staff (in this case only Missy).

But there was nothing wrong with the surrounding landscape. In the neighbourhood there was a so-called hidden lake. In American terms that’s a lake that’s not accessible by car. It was a four mile (6,5 km) hike up there and back, a very suitable distance for us. On the way up there was a lovely little waterfall and the weather was good, even if it was cold. The lake was beautiful and David naturally had to fish it. Dane and I lasted one and a half hour, then he had to come down again with us. Very reluctantly!

There was no Internet connection at the Vermont camp and we were only online for a few hours at a café in the nearby college town Middlebury. In that time we couldn’t find a single campsite on the route from Vermont to Buffalo, N.Y., so we decided to give up seeing the Niagara Falls. But, when we got back to camp that night, we had second thoughts. So close, and then not going!!! So we decided that we could “rough it” if we had to. By “roughing it” I mean parking the RV somewhere and not having access to electricity and water. And we decided to do the whole trip in one day. By far our longest journey – 400 miles (650 km). That may not sound like a lot, but when the first 100 miles are on little roads in the mountains and all of them are in an RV with a march speed of no more than 58 mph (95 km/t), it’s quite a distance.

Having decided that, we jumped into bed and enjoyed the fact that the furnace could keep the temperature at a steady 60 degrees (15 C) throughout the night. At six we got up and at seven we were on our way. We were well rewarded for getting up early, with little traffic and beautiful vistas.

After a long, long day’s drive with a very patient and good Dane, we arrived in Buffalo, safe and sound. Most of the day was spent on the New York Thruway, a tollroad going through the entire state. It cost 18 dollars to cross almost all the way from east to west. That may be expensive, but I’m all in favour of tollroads, so I don’t mind. And particularly not when every plaza on the way offers free Wi-Fi! That was how we found a campsite that was actually open today (but not tomorrow). And that is why I can sit in the RV and write this. With the lights on and water in the taps.

Tomorrow, it’s the falls!

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David is in love

It’s not that he’s fallen out of love with me (I hope), more that he’s fallen head over heals in love with coastal Maine. And it is indescribably beautiful here. Except for one day, when it poured down all day, we’ve been blessed with fantastic October weather. A sky that reaches, well, to the sky I guess… as blue as anything, a few wisps of cloud, and the rivers, lakes, bays and the sea in a million shades of green and blue. And then there’s the foliage. Actually, Bill Bryson describes it marvellously in A Walk in the Woods:

(…) when the world is full of autumn muskiness and crisp, tangy perfection and the air so clear that you feel as if you could reach out and ping it with a finger. Even the colors were crisp: vivid blue sky, deep green fields, leaves in every sharp shade that nature can bestow. It is a truly astounding sight when every tree in a forest becomes individual; where formerly had sprawled a seamless cloak of green there now stood a million bright colors.

On David’s birthday (28th) he got to set the pace for the day. We started with breakfast and presents. He got two long sleeved smartwool microweave t-shirts that he wanted badly after having bought one a couple of days ago. David is very particular with fabrics – he’ll only wear certain kinds and they have to fit him in a certain way. Dane is exactly the same, it’s funny, but makes it hell to shop with them. He also got some Red Sox paraphernalia, a reading light and a book about autumn in New England. And for dinner David had lobster – his favourite food. It’s still the lobster season here, so we saw the little lobster boats going out by the hundreds and in every bay you can see the little buoys telling of the lobster trap beyond and you can see the traps stacked in front of every other house out on the peninsulas. While writing this, we were at a place called Land’s End in an area called the Harpswells – it’s on the very tip of one of a hundred peninsulas in this part of Maine. From here, all you can see are the tips of other peninsulas and the Atlantic – glittering in the sun.

You’ve guessed it already; David and Dane were fishing while I sat inside the RV on the sunny side writing this. Even if I’ve got my life’s first classy outdoor wear, I still find it too cold to just stand about. I’d much rather go for a brisk walk.

Me on the Internet – only place at Maine campground where it was accessible. And Dane in front of lobster traps.

A note about Halloween

We went to a Halloween party at the local YMCA. It was very well done. The entertainment was excellent, the games fun and for everyone, the costumes funny and many of them very inventive. And the parents were all very nice and the children generally very well behaved. There was a haunted house so scary that Dane wouldn’t even go through it together with me. Actually, it was pretty scary! Very well done. Dane looked great in his wizard outfit with a magic wand and pointy hat. But the thing that he wanted the most was to meet other children and play with them. And we had no luck with that, unfortunately. So it wasn’t the success we’d hoped for.

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In a library, finally

I wonder what they mean by that, “The Way Life Should Be”? Must be something with reddened leaves, fresh-cheeked youth, noisy snowmobiles and lobsters for dinner???

I’ve spent a good part of today in Freeport Community Library and it has been lovely. Outside it’s sunny but cool, and Dane and David are fishing. In here it’s quiet, comfy and… eh… bookish! Haven’t read a single page though, been busy on the computer.

Freeport probably wouldn’t exist if it hadn’t been for the extraordinarily well run and well stocked out-door department store L.L. Bean. We spent the best part of yesterday in there and got some good autumnal clothing for the three of us. David is now a record-holder in the number of fleeces owned by one person (who’s not a mountaineer).

I bet that stockholders in L. L. Bean have a lot to say in the town – it’s got the fiercest anti-sign-pollution policy I’ve come across over here. Look at this McDonalds:

It looks so nice you’d almost consider going in there to eat! And the whole town looks like that. Real neat, as the Americans put it.

We think we’ve solved the Halloween problem I mentioned yesterday. We went for gas at a little gas station out in the woods. In there everybody were talking about baseball, baseball, baseball and then a little bit about Halloween. It turns out there are several public arrangements, so we’ll go for some of that and hope that the usual American friendliness will extend to our little Dane. Will tell you how it goes.

And so, don’t you want to know if the Red Sox won the game last night? I bet you don’t give a toss. But they did. They wiped out the Colorado Rockies 13 – 1. We’re already readying ourselves for the next game tonight. Can they do it again?

(picture of master pitcher Josh Beckett borrowed from the Boston Globe)

More commented pictures (not of baseball stars) here.

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New England autumn (or fall as they call it here)

Now we’re embedded in this weird camp ground with Emil safely here. Our trip to the airport was eventless, the one back a real bummer. Arriving at the tollbooth on the way out from the airport the stonefaced asian guy at the booth said: I can’t let you through the tunnel, it would be against the law, park over there, while I call the state police. We tried to ask him – real polite – what the problem was, since we’d just come the other way without any hindrance an hour or so earlier. But he just repeated himself and waved us to the side. A puzzling couple of minutes later, a state trouper arrived, lights flashing. He explained to us, in a voice loud enough to’ve been heard in Norway, that vehicles carrying propane (which all campers use for stove, heating etc.) cannot drive through tunnels. That made perfect sence of course, why in the world couldn’t the attendant have told us that? His voice booming (it turned out he was practically deaf), the elderly trooper told us that he’d spare us the 500$ fine and stop the traffic in the opposite direction and let us go back the way we came. He explained the alternative route to us – it was a little like Einstein explaning the theory of relativity – and led us on our way. We drove, hearts beating, and drove and drove and drove. We constantly seemed to be going in the wrong direction and we never seemed to hit the Interstate, which should eventually have taken us back onto the right track. When we’d driven for an incredible lenght of time (this was after 10 pm), we decided to put the GPS back on, reckoning that we’d have distanced ourselves from the perilous tunnels by now. Well, guess what, we hadn’t! The GPS led us right back into another tunnel, and we didn’t even realise it before it was too late! With hearts in throats and in eerie silence we drove through the seemingly endless tunnel. In the middle of the tunnel, a state trouper was parked, lights flashing. But, luckily, he was engaged in other business, and we made it through the tunnel without blowing it up and without being fined.

You cannot believe how happy we are that our nice New England friends Matt and Jackie have had the grace to lend us their daughter’s (she’s away at university) lovely Saab car for the rest of our stay here. It is a pleasure beyond description to be driving a car – and a car with turbo at that – instead of the slowresponding and extremely noisy RV.

On our first day with Emil we went shopping for fishing equipment in Wal-Mart, which had Emil stunned (see his blog) and then we went fishing. Or rather, the three of them were fishing, while I was theoretically reading my book in a chair. In reality I spent 3/4 of the time untangling Dane’s fishing line from a variety of trees, shrubs and tall grass. They caught a few small fish, but nothing to write home about. In the evening, Matt and Jackie had invited us to dinner at their beautiful house. I can’t explain to you why I haven’t yet taken a photograph of their beautiful New England home, but I will. While I’m at it (confessing) I also forgot to take a picture of the two of them together. Luckily I’ll get a chance or two more. They were increcibly hospitable and had presents for us (!!!), among them a New England water pitcher called the gurgling Cod, which is described  as a Boston icon. It is real cute and I’m looking forward to dinner parties in the future, when my guests will innocently start pouring water from the lovely pitcher and then, when they set it back on the table, hear the gentle gurgling noise, which will be my cue to tell about our visit to the lovely New England.

The boys got each a cap with the Boston Red Sox logo and Emil and Dane also a bat and a baseball each. Can you imagine hosts like that?

Furthermore, the dinner was wonderful and the conversation easy. I talked too much, but as those of you who know me already know, I frequently do.

The next day we went for a day of seeing the local sights together with Matt. We saw Thoreau’s hut and Walden pond, which he immortalized in his book. I’ve had it lying around on my night stand for almost a year, impressively, but honestly, I never got around to reading it, and when I packed it, it was as pristine as when I bought it. Maybe when we get back?

 

Emil and Dane at Walden Pond. A replica of Thoreau’s hut at Walden.

Next we went to the site of the opening battle of the American revolutionary war. From a European perspective there wasn’t a whole lot to see there, but the story about the Minutemen was interesting. Also, the scenery was gorgeous, the weather perfect. And – we’d just had a really nice lunch…

 

 

We’re on the Concord bridge – or a replica, rather. 

On our way home, we were going into the local Whole Foods store, when David accidently banged the lid of the trunk into my forehead. It hurt like hell, to tell you the truth, and it even bled. But poor David, he was out of his mind for having hurt me and kept going over it in his mind, whether he should have seen it coming, etc. etc. But it gave me a good excuse for staying home in the camper today, while the boys have gone fishing. I’ve done the washing, tidied up, vacuumed and written this. And read my book. So I’m perfectly content and don’t even have a headache.

Matt got the best out in all of us, check the happy couple out here and notice David’s cap – he’s turning all-American and almost ready to join the local militia ;-)

More pictures with silly and/or informative comments here.

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Gettysburg

The guidebook told us that Harrisburg, the state capital of Pennsylvania, is “not the most exciting place”, so we just passed it on the opposite side of the Susquehanna River, the bank of which I’m sitting, while writing these lines. The weather right now is probably the balmiest I’ve experienced in all my life. The gentle wind is like a caress of the skin, it’s warm, but not hot and the air is crystal clear, the way it only ever is in autumn. It was pretty cold last night, however, and the locals tell us, that today will be the last day with this unusually warm and pleasant weather. We’ve been incredibly lucky with the weather on our trip, don’t think we don’t appreciate it.

Instead we went to Gettysburg, this most historic of places in America. It had this incredibly corny museum – the American Civil War Museum – that had David and me glancing incredulously at one another. Out front are scores of American flags and the entrance is very majestic. Inside is – a huge souvenir shop… Slightly bewildered, we went to the counter and asked about the museum. The elderly but very brisk lady at the counter brushed us off – there wasn’t enough time, since they were closing at five. It was 4:15. We insisted and got our way. We were ushered into the museum, which turned out to consist of a parade of displays with tableaus of life-size dolls in various vital episodes preceding and under the war. And at the end of this – TADA – we were again ushered by same steely-gray-haired lady into an amphitheatre with a huge display of the same life-size dolls, this time depicting the entire battle at Gettysburg, including a scene where a soldier has his leg cut off by the field surgeon. With a film and educational voice-over in the background, the display was lit up a little at a time and suitable music played. The grand finale was when a display of sinister men with Lincoln in the foreground came rumbling up from the basement and the Gettysburg address came booming out of the loudspeekers.

Some of you readers might be too young, but others will remember oldfashioned department store mannequins and their weird expressions and glassy staring eyes. That’s what they looked like. It was good for Dane, though. A more European style museum may have been less interesting and less informative in his view. Bill Bryson often writes about American museums and how good they are. In one way he’s right -they are good. Because they are simple and play up to the television way of percieving things – perfect when you’re with an endlessly curious child. In another way he’s not. They are annoying, because they seem to believe that I’m a complete ignorant and need to have everything explained to me as if I were a dimwit (no comments, please).

After that we crossed the road to the enormous Gettysburg National Cemetery. Originally being the burial ground of the many, many union soldiers who died here during the three day stand-off (the confederate soldiers were all taken home and buried in the South), it has since become a burial ground for soldiers, who died in later wars. There are litterally hundreds, maybe even thousands of little stones for soldiers who perished in WW1 and WW2. But also in the Spanish-American war and in Korea and Vietnam. It is a solemn but very beautiful place.

 

It was also here, a few years later, that Lincoln delivered the aforementioned address.

For that night we hadn’t booked a campsite. Among the little advertisements on the town map, Dane found one that he thought looked very promising. Since it was only a mile away, we went for that. It was huge, the amenities were mediocre (would probably have been better in the summer) and miles away from the site they gave us, which had nothing all the other sites we’ve been on didn’t. And it was the hitherto most expensive one. What a disappointment! On top of it being ridiculously expensive, it was also the first site, where we had to pay seperately for the Wi-Fi. A total rip-off.

The contrast therefore to the campsite we’ve been on since yesterday, was stunning. This one is small, totally humble, with few but adequate amenities, free Wi-Fi (which actually works without me having to wave the computer at the signal), extremely nice people (a couple who owns the place) and an absolutely sublime location. We’re on a small island in the Susquehanna River near the town of Sunbury. And the camper is parked, so that this was the view from the “bedroom” window around 8 o’clock pm:

And here’s what I’ve been looking at all day, from the very comfortable perspective of a deck chair in the sun with either book or computer at hand:

When at dusk I finally lured them out of the water, we had dinner outside by the fire. It was just perfect! David only caught a single fish (small-mouth bass according to camp owner), but doesn’t seem to mind, as long as he can stand out there all day and enjoy the scenery. David and Dane both had the pleasure of seing a beaver – it had a little dam at one of the riverbanks a little way up river. I missed that one.

Tomorrow we will be going east into the state of New York. Now it’s only a few days till we’re picking Emil up in Boston’s Logan airport (Sunday). We’re all looking forward to spending a week with him. He is also an avid fisherman, so the three of them will probably drive off to some distant river and leave me to a day of shopping in Boston (or is that perhaps wishful thinking?).

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Catching up

My aunt’s funeral was just as it should be. Her son and daughter had taken great pains to make arrangements that would have pleased my aunt and that would be pleasing to the family. The coffin was decorated with the Danish flag and red and white flowers, and they’d found a Lutheran pastor, who held a very good and balanced speech, where he touched upon both my aunt’s addiction and her recovery through AA, many years ago. He did both in a subtle but yet straightforward way.

Before I went to Texas we went for a tour on foot in the swampy forest outside Savannah, where we were camping. It was wilderness for dummies, so we weren’t exactly about to get lost. But since it wasn’t the weekend or holiday, we were by ourselves. It was hot, humid, different and fascinating.

The color and the stillness

Crabs – hundreds of them

What a tree!

We visited Savannah, but were’nt really that impressed. Much to our own surprise. The much acclaimed River Walk was extremely touristy and rather sordid. We found a really nice café and enjoyed the many lovely, shady squares. We also visited one of the houses from the 19th century. We couldn’t help snickering a little. When you come from a country where you don’t even raise an eyebrow to churches that are 800-1000 years old, it’s quite funny to experience the Americans’ awe over objects and houses that are less than 200 years old. But – the other side of that coin is, that we Europeans could learn about taking more pride in our history from the Americans.

Talking of history – the next day we visited Fort Pulaski. A fort that it took 12 years to built, but only 30 hours’ of union bombardement to conquer.

While I was away, Dane and David had a great time doing real father-son things. They went fishing, but all they caught was a poor old turtle, which they of course let go again. They saw an alligator in the lake by the camp ground, so didn’t go fishing in that lake… They wen’t canoing together and Dane climbed a twenty meter climbing wall. Probably all for the best that Mommy wasn’t around for that!

As mentioned earlier, Dane has developed a vivid interest in the second world war, battleships and fighter planes. At Patriot’s Point he got lots more input to feed that interest.

More and bigger-size pictures here.

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Texan hospitality

Yesterday mornings fishing trip went really well. Not that the party caught a lot of fish, but they had a great time, which, as I understand it, is the most important thing about going fishing.

The whole fishing party: David, Dan, Billy and Mark with Dane in front

Look at me, it’s a shrimp and it’s (almost) alive!

Fishing is dead easy!

See!

We spent yesterday afternoon checking out the downtown area (which is always really hard to find in American cities?!?) of Galveston. Some quite fun shops with silly souvenirs and a lovely little café, where a psychiatry student gave us a quick rundown of the pros and cons of an Iphone. Won’t trouble you with that, though, lots of pros have done that already on blogs and elsewhere.

When we arrived at Dan and René’s beautiful house, the very important local college football match was on on the wide screen television. Without really knowing it, Dane was already a fan of one of the teams. Dan tried to teach Dane the game in half an hour. I’m afraid most of it was lost on Dane, but he was happy when “his” team won!

The sign Dan is making means “Texas Longhorns”!

Renée had cooked us a lovely meal of breaded, deepfried tilapia, boiled shrimps and a variety of yummy sidedishes. We enjoyed the sunset from the balcony and then took a ride in Dan’s little golf cart down to the beach for a nightly walk.

Then everyone was tired and we rode home to the campground in our RV. And I drove – for the first time. And David didn’t shout at me – not once!

Thanks to Dan and Renée  for showing us the best of Texas!

More pictures from this lovely day (and other days) can be seen here.

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